The Thomas Busby Chair

 

The Thomas Busby Chair

In this article we will be looking at the strange case of ​the Thomas Busby chair. Are you sitting comfortably? Then we’ll begin…

Drinking Thomas

Thomas Busy didn’t miss many chances to get a beer down his throat. He was a well known character in his local pub for all the wrong reasons.

He was a known thief and the alcohol did not often agree with him. If anyone said a word out of place to him they would soon find themselves out cold on the floor.

Daniel Awety was a successful coin-forger who just so happened to be Thomas’s father-in-law. He had amassed a great deal of money over the years and decided to splash out on a local farm up for sale.

As soon as the purchase went through he rename,d the property Danotty Hall ( after himself of course! ). It was situated in a lovely rural spot close to the village of Kirby Wiske.

One night in the summer of 1702, Awety fancied a beer after a long day’s graft. He visited his son-in-law’s favorite pub and accidentally sat down in his favorite chair.

When Busby later arrived at the pub he noticed his father-in-law sitting in his chair and went through the roof. A vicious fight broke out between the two men resulting in them rolling about the bar room floor.

After the scuffle, Awety rose from the ground and told Busby he was taking his daughter back off him and returning home with her. He returned to Danotty Hall to plan out his next move.

Later that night Busby quietly broke into the property and put an end to his father-in-law’s life as he slept.

It didn’t take long for the local police to find Awety’s body in the local woods – they instantly knew who was responsible for his death.

Busby stood trial and was sentenced to death by hanging – he was allowed one last request before the execution was carried out. He chose to have a drink in his favorite chair.

Once he had finished his drink he was led away to the gallows to be dealt with. As he walked away he stopped and let all the surrounding locals know “Death shall come swiftly to anyone that dares to sit in my chair”.

The Thomas Busby Chair

Several decades later the Thomas Busby chair claimed it’s first victim. A young chimney sweep decided to pop into the pub for a quick lunchtime drink but discovered that it was really full.

There was only one chair spare and he decided to ignore the local legend surrounding it. He rested his weary legs as he enjoyed his drink.

The hex hit him about an hour after lunch – he fell from a nearby roof and died instantly as he hit the ground.

This incident was enough to convince the locals that Busby’s hex was alive and kicking and nobody went near it until the WWII came about. In this period the pub was frequented by numerous young soldiers who used to dare one another to sit in the chair.

Those that were brave enough never returned home from action.

In 1967 a pair of rather drunken RAF pilots decided to take on the chair’s hex and paid the price within minutes of leaving the pub. Their car only made it around the street corner before veering into a local tree and bursting into flames.

Enough is Enough

The local landlord at the time realized that this chair was an extremely powerful paranormal object. He decided that enough was enough and removed the object from public display.

It was placed in the beer cellar beneath the pub where nobody could make the mistake of sitting on it.

Unfortunately, a few years later a local bricklayer who was working on the pub decided to take a little rest. He slipped down to the basement and sat on the chair in the darkness for a few minutes.

Within an hour of him returning to work on the pub he was killed in a tragic accident. This was the final straw for the landlord.

He quickly contacted the Thirsk Museum who had already shown an interest in the antique chair. They jumped at the opportunity to take it and sent a security firm to come and pick it up.

The chair remains in the Thirsk Museum to this day – they have suspended it more than six feet off the ground. Nobody is allowed to touch the item – not even the museum workers…

If you have any thoughts or opinions on the hex of Busby’s chair please leave them in the comment section below.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*